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Wisconsin Department of Transportation

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Newsline audio releases – September 26, 2014

Listed below are MP3 audio files and the text of actualities and wraps associated with WisDOT's Radio Newsline.

October and November are peak months for car-deer crashes in Wisconsin. David Pabst, director of WisDOT’s Bureau of Transportation Safety, has some potentially life-saving advice.

Cut 1: David Pabst, Bureau of Transportation Safety (332 KB/21 seconds)

“The best thing people can do is buckle up, slow down, and just be alert. If you can’t avoid a crash, brake firmly, but stay in your lane and in control of your vehicle. If you hit a deer, get your vehicle off the road if possible and call law enforcement. And remember, walking around a highway is very dangerous. It’s generally best to stay buckled up and in your vehicle until help arrives.”

Cut 2: David Pabst, Bureau of Transportation Safety (305 KB/19 seconds)

“Crashes with deer can happen at any time of the day, but deer tend to be most active in the early morning and early evening hours. All drivers need to be alert, but not surprisingly motorcyclists are especially vulnerable. Last year in Wisconsin, eight people lost their lives in deer-vehicle crashes — and six of those were motorcyclists.”

Cut 3: Wrap with Pabst(829 KB/53 seconds)

Fall in Wisconsin means football, falling leaves, and deer darting unexpectedly into roadways. Dave Pabst, director of the Wisconsin DOT’s Bureau of Transportation Safety talks about what to do to avoid car-deer crashes, and steps to take if you do hit a deer.

“The best thing people can do is buckle up, slow down, and just be alert. If you can’t avoid a crash, brake firmly, but stay in your lane and in control of your vehicle. If you hit a deer, get your vehicle off the road if possible and call law enforcement. And remember, walking around a highway is very dangerous. It’s generally best to stay buckled up and in your vehicle until help arrives.”

All drivers need to be alert, but Pabst says motorcyclists are especially vulnerable. Last year in Wisconsin, eight people lost their lives in deer-vehicle crashes and six of those were motorcyclists. This is Rob Miller reporting.


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Last modified: September 25, 2014

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