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Wisconsin Department of Transportation

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Newsline audio releases - April 18, 2014

Listed below are MP3 audio files and the text of actualities and wraps associated with WisDOT's Radio Newsline.

Tuesday, April 22 is Earth Day. Steve Krebs with the Wisconsin DOT’s Bureau of Technical Services talks about several department practices related to recycling and reuse.

Cut 1: Steve Krebs, Bureau of Technical Services (389 KB/25 seconds)

“Basically, all asphalt or concrete pavements are recycled as part of a project. Asphalts can be re-heated and re-used as part of the new pavement. With concrete — we’ll crush it into smaller pieces and it can be used in a number of different applications in the highway such as shoulder material along the roadway or as base course underneath the pavement or in the new concrete pavement itself.”

Cut 2: Steve Krebs, Bureau of Technical Services (359 KB/23 seconds)

“We’re always looking for ways to use recycled materials either in or under our pavements. One thing we’ve done is to allow a certain amount of recycled asphalt shingles as part of new asphaltic pavements. A typical shingle is about 25 percent asphalt — and so they can be re-heated and then used to help replace a certain amount of virgin material.”

Cut 3: Wrap with Krebs (1037 KB/66 seconds)

“Green” initiatives are in the spotlight as part of Earth Day. Steve Krebs is an engineer with the Wisconsin DOT’s Materials Management Section. Krebs says the DOT incorporates a variety of recycled or waste materials into transportation projects.

“Basically, all asphalt or concrete pavements are recycled as part of a project. Asphalts can be re-heated and re-used as part of the new pavement. With concrete — we’ll crush it into smaller pieces and it can be used in a number of different applications in the highway such as shoulder material along the roadway or as base course underneath the pavement or in the new concrete pavement itself.”

Krebs says various waste materials can be used either in or under pavements including asphalt shingles, pulverized toilets and glass, and industrial byproducts such as fly ash and foundry slag. Each year, the Wisconsin DOT incorporates about two million tons of recycled materials into transportation projects statewide. This is Rob Miller reporting.

It’s a sure sign of spring in south central Wisconsin. The Merrimac Ferry is once again providing a free connection across the Wisconsin River. Angela Adams, operations chief for the DOT’s Southwest Region, says the ferry is greener this season. 

Cut 1: Angela Adams, operations chief, SW Region-Madison (339 KB/22 seconds)

“During this past winter timeframe we did work on installing some new environmentally-friendly diesel engines. They reduce emissions and do ensure that the operability of it will be consistent and efficient throughout the rest of the year. About 270,000 vehicles were taken across the ferry last year. It takes about 15 vehicles at a time and actually will take bicycles, too.”

Cut 2: Angela Adams, operations chief, SW Region-Madison (330 KB/21 seconds)

“The Merrimac Ferry Service travels across the Wisconsin River. It’s been traveling across the Wisconsin, in that location, since the 1840s. Colsac III actually comes from the names of a combination between Columbia and Sauk county, which is the two counties that it travels between. The ferry actually connects Highway 113 and functions as part of that highway facility.”

Cut 3: Angela Adams, operations chief, SW Region-Madison (954 KB/61 seconds)

It’s a sure sign of spring in south central Wisconsin. The Merrimac Ferry is once again providing a free connection across the Wisconsin River. Angela Adams, operations chief for the DOT’s Southwest Region, says the ferry is greener this season.

“During this past winter timeframe we did work on installing some new environmentally-friendly diesel engines. They reduce emissions and do ensure that the operability of it will be consistent and efficient throughout the rest of the year. About 270,000 vehicles were taken across the ferry last year. It takes about 15 vehicles at a time and actually will take bicycles, too.”

Adams says it takes about seven minutes to cross the Wisconsin River between Columbia and Sauk counties at Highway 113. The ferry is the only one remaining on the state highway network. It’s owned by the DOT and operated by Columbia County. The Merrimac Ferry provides service 24 hours a day, seven days a week when the river is free of ice. This is Brock Bergey reporting.


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Last modified:April 17 2014

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